HERITAGE LISTING

Tomaree Lodge has heritage significance at a State level. It has historic significance because of its use as an Army Garrison Camp during the Second World War. The site is a physical demonstration of Port Stephens' important contribution to the Second World War, when it was developed as a military base by the joint Australian Army-United States Navy defence ventures in March 1942, following the appointment of General Douglas MacArthur as supreme commander of the South West Pacific sector.

The site has high archaeological potential and high archaeological research value. There are relatively few intact former World War Two army camps in New South Wales which have such high archaeological potential. Any archaeological relics dating from the World War Two period on the site have the potential to contain information not available from other sources. It also has strong interpretive values and research potential due to its relationship to other World War Two military sites in Port Stephens and Newcastle, including Fort Tomaree (and the associated camps at Tomaree Head), Camp Gan Gan and HMAS Assault, also known as the Joint Overseas Operational Training School (JOOTS).

The site is a landmark on the foreshore of Shoal Bay at the entrance to Port Stephens. The site is rare as one of the few surviving, relatively intact Army garrison camps dating from the Second World War in New South Wales.

While Tomaree Lodge has some representative value as an example of a health facility in the state for people with mental illness and developmental disability, it is unique in this group due to its earlier use as a World War Two Army Camp. There are relatively few intact former World War Two army camps in the state. Tomaree Lodge is one of the few known surviving examples of this type of purpose-built accommodation for the military in the State.

Tomaree Holiday Lodge was listed on the New South Wales State Heritage Register on 2nd April 1999 having satisfied the following criteria.

The place is important in demonstrating the course, or pattern, of cultural or natural history in New South Wales.

Tomaree Lodge has State significance because of its prior use as an Army Garrison Camp during the Second World War. The site is a physical demonstration of Port Stephens' important contribution to the Second World War, when it was developed as a military base by the joint Australian Army-United States Navy defence ventures in March 1942, following the appointment of General Douglas MacArthur as supreme commander of the South West Pacific sector.

The place is important in demonstrating aesthetic characteristics and/or a high degree of creative or technical achievement in New South Wales.

Tomaree Lodge has aesthetic significance at a Local level, due to its landmark qualities on the foreshore of Shoal Bay at the entrance to Port Stephens.

The place has a strong or special association with a particular community or cultural group in New South Wales for social, cultural or spiritual reasons.

The social significance of the Tomaree Lodge has not been assessed. However, it is likely that it has strong association with past and present residents and staff. Tomaree Lodge has been, and continues to be, home to many of these people who have spent extended periods of their life there. The significance of Tomaree Lodge to the local community was clearly established when there was vocal public opposition to its sale in 1989.

The place has potential to yield information that will contribute to an understanding of the cultural or natural history of New South Wales.

Tomaree Lodge has technical significance at a State level because the land surrounding it has high archaeological potential and high archaeological research value related to its use during World War Two. There are relatively few intact former World War Two army camps in New South Wales which have such high archaeological potential. Any archaeological relics dating from the World War Two period on the site have the potential to contain information not available from other sources.

Tomaree Lodge has strong interpretive values and research potential due to its relationship to other World War Two military sites in Port Stephens and Newcastle, including Fort Tomaree (and the associated camps at Tomaree Head), Camp Gan Gan and HMAS Assault, also known as the Joint Overseas Operational Training School (JOOTS).

The nine Large Residential Centres owned or managed by Department of Ageing, Disability and Home Care (as at January 2009), including the Tomaree Centre, have technical / research significance at a State Level for their potential to explain the ways that residential health facilities for people with mental illness and disabilities in NSW were designed, built and operated, reflecting the changing attitudes and philosophies of care over the twentieth century.

The place possesses uncommon, rare or endangered aspects of the cultural or natural history of New South Wales.

Tomaree Lodge has rarity value at a State level as one of the few surviving, relatively intact Army garrison camps dating from the Second World War in New South Wales. While Tomaree Lodge has some representative value as an example of a health facility in the state for people with mental illness and developmental disability, it is unique in this group due to its earlier use as a World War Two Army Camp.

ABOUT US

The Tomaree Museum Association Incorporated aims to develop a  regional museum and interpretative centre to document, protect and promote the history and changing natural environment of Port Stephens.

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF TRADITIONAL CUSTODIANS

The Tomaree Museum Association acknowledges the Worimi people, the traditional owners and custodians of the land and waters upon which Tomaree Museum stands. We should like to pay our respect to the Elders past and present, and through them to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are advised that this website contains a range of material which may be culturally sensitive including records of people who may have passed away.

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